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The Worst Customer Service I Have Ever Received- And I’m Mad As Hell

Have I gone mad? Or is this just the most bizarre story you’ve heard about screwing up a customer ‘Moment of Truth?’ It’s the worst customer service experience I have ever had. Your views?

CMO Andy is passionate about a lot of things: Zero Moments Of Dissatisfaction is one one them, a nice twist on the ‘Moments Of Truth’ concept. If he had hair, he’d pull it out hearing this story.

I was booked to leave on a Tuesday on a flight to Singapore. Four days later, I’d meet ‘important others’ (flying from Sydney that day) at Singapore airport to fly together to Europe, returning to Sydney together a couple of weeks later. Then, a problem. The day before I was due to fly, one of my ‘important others’ fell sick. Full-on flu. Bed-ridden. I needed to be there for the next four key days to help ready all for the trip. I called the airline. “I won’t make the Sydney to Singapore flight. I don’t want any refund, no worries. In fact, I will book a new and separate flight with your airline Sydney to Singapore four days later so I can make the Singapore-Europe connection/leg of my original ticket. Okay?” Their answer rocked me:

How To Get What You Want- Every Time!

There’s something I do at the start of most meetings that often shocks those there. Some love it. Some hate it. It’s a recipe, though, for getting what you want- in business, and in life. Do you do it?

My current working day is filled with meetings- often 10 to 12 in a day. Some I set up. Usually, given my role, it’s others who have asked to see me- colleagues, potential partners, industry associates, general contacts. I have to move through them quickly, efficiently, and with focus and momentum.

So I often start meetings others have asked for with this question: “Before we begin, tell me this- if you had a magic wand, what would happen at the end of the meeting- what is it you want from me or want me to do?” It’s a concept I encourage all to embrace. Do it for yourselves. This is what I mean. This is the habit I encourage you- and me- to do a lot more of.

The Key To Falling In Love With Your Job Again

I have discovered the secret to making sure your job is filled with great moments, experiences and buzz. It’s the key to preventing staleness, stagnation and depletion. Seriously- they should make a movie about it. Here it is.

I got the clue watching the movie “The Grand Budapest Hotel.” The aged hotel owner, who occasionally returns to the hotel where he started out as a Bell Boy, always stays in the smallest room, with no bathroom. Later, in the flashbacks, we see it’s the room he lived in as a young lad, when he was learning the trade, and having a blast. And that reminded me of another great movie, “Citizen Kane”, where the defeated, miserable, sad media tycoon, on his deathbed, murmurs “Rosebud…Rosebud….” The camera takes us to the attic of his house where we discover the name of his childhood snow sleigh was just that.

You see, both depleted men returned to the source of their greatest happiness- and wanted to spend time in that memory again. And here’s the insight I got from that- powerful and real. And I am putting it into action right now.

How To Keep Clients Coming Back For More- And More

My favorite hotel stuffed up a critical ‘moment of truth’ last week. So basic. So damaging. And a powerful lesson for us all. If you have clients, then read this post. Follow this one tip, and you’ll keep clients longer- much longer. Here’s how.
 
I’ve stayed at the hotel once a month for 14 years. Loyalty personified. Last Tuesday, having booked my normal style of room on an important visit accompanied by family, I was given the worst room in the hotel- wrong bed configuration, and a heavy smoker clearly having recently frequented it. Wrong. All wrong. I asked to change rooms. Hotel fully booked. I asked again. Minimal response. “But it was not what I booked,” I pleaded.  Bad luck- it’s all we have. I rushed off to a meeting. Tried to resolve by phone. The outcome- it does not matter. Here’s the point.
 
This hotel failed in the most basic imperative of outstanding client service. Here it is:

Look In The Mirror- Can You See This Fatal Flaw?

We were celebrating our client’s triumph in the most hostile takeover in Australian corporate history when its Chief Executive sobered the mood with a warning that has stayed with me ever since. It is a massive ‘watch out’ for businesses and ourselves. Do you suffer from this fatal flaw?

When client Campbell Soup Company launched a takeover bid for Australian biscuit maker Arnotts in 1991, the newspaper headline screamed : ”US Cookie Monster Wants To Gobble Our Arnotts.” So began a hugely emotive and aggressively fought takeover war, which ended with Campbell’s gaining control at the last gasp against all expectations.

The celebration cocktail party was in full swing a few weeks later, all the advisors and client executives in fine form, when Campbell CEO David Johnson (coincidentally- an Australian), gave us this chilling warning during his speech. “Enjoy the moment, “he said, “but be very careful. Because, remember this…..”

A Lesson From The GFC- Remind Yourselves, And Brace For Tough Times

Look around- what do you see? Yes indeed- it’s the GFC, by stealth. No headlines this time, screaming ‘GFC!!!” Just every business leader I meet telling me, “We have never seen it tougher than this.” If you and your business are to survive icy winds ahead, remember this golden rule of survival in tough times. Ignore it at your peril.

Ever see the movie, “Zulu”? The hordes are swarming over the barricades, a straggling group of red coated English soldiers desperately firing at them, just keep them at bay. Bullets are running short. Soldiers rush back to the ammunition hut. “More ammo!!!” they scream. “Fill in the form first,” says the munitions Captain.
Madness. If ever there was a time to change the agreed process, that was it!

In the words of Robbie Deans, when he took over as coach of the Australian Wallabies rugby team, his philosophy was built around one thing alone: