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Addendum to this week’s post about the pilot

Within hours of this week’s Wrestling Possums post going live with the story on the Qantas pilot who safely brought a troubled flight to safety by focusing on what he had, rather than what he’d lost , I received an email from the very captain himself. Richard thanked me for sharing his story and for […]

The Passing of Steven Arif Abdullah Lyons and Why Love Endures

Eleven years ago this week a great friend died by my side in a hospital bed in Kuala Lumpur. I want to remember him today. Importantly, to remember the one thing about Steve that was insanely unforgettable. Read this post of his death, life and future, and you will never forget it. Promise.

A great leader is someone who knows how to inspire. Genuinely inspire. With time we forget what they said, we forget what they did, but we NEVER forget how the made us FEEL. Eleven years after his death, I remember crisply, clearly, vividly… how Steve Lyons made me feel. Invincible. Unbeatable. A king. A star. Wanted. Supported. And he made me feel loved. As he did many people across the region.

This is a story about Steve’s death. About the life he lead. The impact he made and left. And how Steve and his inspiring aura lives on- 11 years later. Quite simply, I publish below the email I sent to Steve’s massive circle of friends around the world just after he died. I know most of you don’t know Steve- it does not matter, give it a read. Some of you do. Enjoy the reminder!

You Have To Have This To Succeed- Why We All Need A Justus In Our Lives

Justus died the day before I was to have lunch with him- about three weeks ago. His death really struck me. Not only because I’ll miss him. But because I realized how lucky I had been to have him in my life, for one year, 15 years ago. Here’s why, and there’s a powerful lesson for us all in this story.

When Justus came into my life, I did not want him in it. He was appointed my Chairman, with a brief to keep me under control. He was a tough, opinionated, seasoned former big time CEO. A Dutchman. He asked questions I did not want to answer. I deeply resented his forced intrusion into my world.

But then I began to look forward to being with him: I began to long for it. Because Justus listened to my answers. And then made suggestions- not directly, but by sharing his experiences in similar circumstances.

When I decided to resign from that role and phase of my career, it was Justus I told first. He understood. He embraced me. And we kept in touch ever since. Justus had been for me, for that one tough year, the most valuable asset we can have. He was my: